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Argyle’s Dead Wrestlers Society

BJB

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Wrestlemania....

The super bowl of wrestling takes place this sunday at safeco field in seattle... Anyone going?? Me and 3 buds heading down tommorow and should be a good weekend. Where on sunday get to see Limp Bizkit, The MillerLite Catfight girls :D ohh and yes 4 hours of wrestling... I haven't been paying attention much as i did as a kid, but Wrestlemania, i've always wanted to see....

Any other TTPers heading down for the weekend to seattle??
 

Argyle

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Originally posted by Notty
Some how know one will shut this thread down! So I'll say it again...Wrestling Sucks.
How can you not enjoy wrestling?
 

Argyle

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Miss Elizabeth passes away

TSN.ca Staff

5/1/2003

Elizabeth Hulette, better known to wrestling fans as Miss Elizabeth has passed away.
According to reports, authorities in Atlanta were called to the house of Larry Pfohl (Lex Luger) early Thursday morning responding to a call placed about a woman being sick at the residence.
Elizabeth was taken to Kennestone Hospital where she later died.
Reports also indicate that Pfohl, who was brought in for questioning because the incident took place in his residence, was released Thursday morning.
A cause of death report isn't likely until toxicology tests are done. It's speculated that results won't be available for about 30 days.
Hulette was born on November 19, 1960 in Kentucky. She later graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in Communications.
Elizabeth made her debut in wrestling as the manager of her then-husband Randy 'Macho Man' Savage (Randy Poffo) in the mid-1980's. She divorced Savage in 1992, and following the break-up of her second marriage in 1997, was linked romantically with Luger.
Over her career, Elizabeth managed many wrestlers and was part of the nWo in the late 1990's in WCW.
'Miss Elizabeth' was 42.

My sources have informed me that Luger was arrested, and charged with having drugs in his house. Not known what those drugs were...
 

bertrum

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Miss Elizabeth

Rest in peace. Compared to todays bimbo's she had some class and she WAS good looking.:(
 

knvb

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I can't believe she was shagging Luger. Probably O-D on Horse Tranquilizers if it was at his house. Two words Roid rage.

That is a bit sad though, as Bert said, Classy for wrestling. Notty will be devastated.




Ooooooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhh Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhh!
 

Argyle

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The Passing of a Canadian Legend

Stu Hart: 1915-2003

TSN.ca Staff
10/16/2003

Stewart Edward Hart, better known to Canadians and wrestling fans around the world as Stu Hart, passed away at at Rockyview General Hospital on Thursday from complications due to diabetes and pneumonia. He was 88 years old.
Hart had been admitted to the hospital on Oct. 3 for Staph
Infection, which had developed on his elbow after falling.
Hart was a legend in Canada and the wrestling world, beginning his career as an amateur champion, and launching Stampede Wrestling, a Canadian institution for the sport in Western Canada. Hart was best known by a generation of wrestling fans as the patriarch of the legendary Hart family.
Together with his late wife Helen - who passed away in two years ago - the Harts had 12 children, almost all of who were involved in some way with the wrestling business.
Hart was born May 3, 1915 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. He was an outstanding amateur wrestler and a standout center for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League. With experience and skill in both sports, Stu eventually chose to pursue wrestling, and enjoyed a celebrated career as a pro wrestler for more than 40 years.
Hart enlisted in the Navy in World War II and entertained the troops by wrestling in exhibitions against the likes of Sandor Kovacs and Al Korman. After the war, Hart made his way to New York where he began his pro career, and met his future bride Helen.
Since he wasn't a top contender in the New York area, he started making his way out West, learning the behind-the-scenes business of promotion. In 1948, Hart founded Big Time Wrestling in Edmonton, which was renamed Wildcat Wrestling.
The Harts then moved to Calgary, where Stu managed to make additional money in real estate. In 1951, he bought into the local Stampede Promotion.
Stampede Wrestling, a longtime member of the National Wrestling Alliance, became a Canadian Broadcasting Tradition, with the late great Ed Whalen providing play-by-play and commentary for each show.
The league was often seen as a combination of traditional North American show style of wrestling, and the more realistic Japanese style.
The promotion was built around Stu's sons Bruce, Keith, and Bret, combined with stars such as The Dynamite Kid, Davey Boy Smith, Bad News Allen, "Lightning" Leo Burke, Herculese Ayala, Mr. Hito, Duke Meyers, The Great Gama Singh, and the Kiwis.
As well known as he was as a promoter, Stu was renowned for his legendary "Dungeon," where he would train promising wrestlers. Hart would bring in strongmen and football players to his own basement where he would stretch them, abuse them, and even make them cry. Those who managed to survive the rigors of "The Dungeon" would earn a badge of respect that no other form of training could give them. Performers who were taught in the Dungeon were branded as quality wrestlers.
It wasn’t long before promoters began sending their raw talents to Hart for training. He molded Montreal stars Rick Martel and Jacques Rougeau Jr., who were both in the Dungeon before they were 18. Vince McMahon's World Wrestling Federation came calling in 1984, and with it went many of the promotion's biggest stars. Dynamite, Davey, Jim Neidhart, and Bret all headed for the bright lights of the WWF, where they would find new stardom. Greg Valentine and Jake Roberts were also sent North by their fathers for seasoning, along with future stars such as Edge, Christian and Kurt Angle.
Stampede Wrestling faded into the sunset in the early 1990's, but it made a return with Stu's blessing a few years ago. The promotion has already brought a new generation star in Teddy Hart (who made his NWA-TNA debut a few months ago), and the future looks bright with the British Bulldog's son Harry set to make his debut in the next year or so.
Stu was named to the Order of Canada on May 31, 2001 for making an important contribution to the sport of wrestling for more than five decades. The Order of Canada officially lists Stu's accomplishments as follows:
"As patriarch of Canada's first family of professional wrestling, he has made an important contribution to the sport for more than five decades. Founder of Stampede Wrestling and an icon of the golden era of wrestling, he has been coach and mentor to countless young athletes, imparting the highest standards of athleticism and personal conduct. A generous supporter of community life in Calgary, he is a loyal benefactor to more than thirty charitable and civic organizations including the Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children and the Alberta Firefighters Toy Fund."
In the years following Owen's tragic death in the WWF, the family had been bitterly divided, but it was always Stu and Helen who held the family together, serving as a powerful nucleus for what is arguably the most famous wrestling family in the world.
Stu Hart will be remembered for many things, a humanitarian who gave to many charities, a loving father and husband who helped sire a brood that would entertain generations of wrestling fans, a wrestler who in his day dazzled and entertained the crowds, a promoter who created in Stampede Wrestling a legendary promotion which lives on to this day, and a trainer who helped mold most of the superstars who entertain us today.
 

Captain Shamrock

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Sad news.

Is it my imagination or is Sable's ass looking bigger than normal? Stephanie McMahon is a fcuking disgusting beast now. She used to be bad but now.........
 

Regs

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Ms Elizabeth followup

Miss Elizabeth had blood alcohol level of 0.29

Friday, August 1, 2003 3:53 AM EDT
By Michelle Graff
Marietta Daily Journal Staff Writer

MARIETTA 1; A fatal of mix of pills and alcohol caused the untimely and accidental April death of the wrestling icon “Miss Elizabeth,” according to the final autopsy results released Thursday.


At the time of her death, 42-year-old Elizabeth Hulette had a blood alcohol level of 0.29 and a mix of painkillers, nausea medication and tranquilizers in her system, said Mark Bishop, operations manager of the Cobb County Medical Examiner’s Office.

In Georgia, drivers operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content of 0.08 or above are considered impaired.

Bishop said Ms. Hulette’s death has been ruled accidental, due to “acute toxicity,” or an overdose. He said there is nothing to indicate suicide or foul play.

Ms. Hulette, who shared an east Marietta townhouse with wrestler Lex Luger, whose real name is Lawrence Pfohl, was rushed to the hospital early in the morning hours of April 30. Luger had called 911 to report that Ms. Hulette wasn’t breathing. She died a short time later at WellStar Kennestone Hospital.

The news of Ms. Hulette’s death spread far and wide, with wrestling fans posting memorials on Web sites to honor the wrestling icon.

A native of Kentucky, Ms. Hulette was a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a degree in communications. She entered into the world of professional wrestling in the 1980s. She managed wrestlers such as a Hulk Hogan and “Macho Man” Randy Savage, to whom she was married for eight years.

Ms. Hulette and the 44-year-old Pfohl were dating at the time of her death.


Pfohl was arrested and charged with 13 felony counts of possession of a controlled substance and a misdemeanor count of distribution of dangerous drugs the day of Ms. Hulette’s death, police said. His nickname in the world of wrestling is “The Total Package.”

According to the warrant, Pfohl had hundreds bottles of steroids 1; some of which are legal with a prescription and some of which have been banned in the United States 1; painkillers, and 98 pills of the anti-anxiety drug Xanax.
 

Argyle

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Another legend gone...

I’m sad to report that Michael Hegstrand, better known as Road Warrior Hawk of the Legion of Doom, died at 1:30am this morning.

He had just sold his condo and planned to move to his new home today in Tampa, FL. His wife, Dale, said, "He was going to lay down for a while, he didn't feel well." She believed at the tome that it was just from all the packing and the excitement of the move to Florida.

On behalf of the Rajah WWF staff and the visitors here, we send out our deepest sympathies and prayers to the friends and family of Michael “Hawk” Hegstrand.
 

Captain Shamrock

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I would hate to jump to conclusions but a lot of these wrestlers are going at a young age. Surely, their involvement with steroids can't be ignored. Young kids should be made aware of this......
 

Argyle

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And yet another...

Mike 'Crash Holly' Lockwood dead at 34

TSN.ca Staff

11/6/2003

Michael Lockwood, known professionally in the wrestling world as Crash Holly, passed away on Thursday.
No official details regarding his death have been released.
Lockwood was a 14 year veteran of professional wrestling, and competed as Erin O'Grady in All Pro Wrestling, ECW, and Memphis Power Pro Wrestling before earning a shot in WWE.
Lockwood was brought into WWE on August 16th, 1999 as Bob "Hardcore" Holly's cousin, claiming he was 6'6" and over 400 pounds. Together the Holly's claimed that they weighed over 800lbs in their entrance announcement. With his cousin Hardcore, the two took the WWF Tag-Team Championship from Mankind and The Rock on October 18, 1999, and lost the belt three weeks later to Mankind and Al Snow.
His most successful run was as the "Houdini of Hardcore" where he held the WWE Hardcore Championship on and off for a period of a year, where he instituded the now infamous 24/7 rule by stating that he was so tough that he would defend the belt anytime, anywhere. This eventually led to a Battle Royale at WrestleMania 13 where Crash won and lost the belt twice in the match.
Lockwood ran a wrestling school of his own, and appeared in indy bookings and NWA-TNA.
 

ParkHead

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It seems one of these guys is dying almost every month. Really quite a shame and hopefully this is not another one that envolve's steriods and other drugs.

Parkhead
 

Argyle

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Yet another...

Jerry the Wall Tiute dead at 36

Jerry Tiute, who performed as "The Wall" in World Championship Wrestling, and as "Malice" in NWA-TNA, passed away early Saturday morning from what is being described as an "Acute heart attack".
Tiute was found unconscious in his hotel room by Adolfo Tapia (La Parka) and Nosawa who had returned from a meal to say goodbye before heading to the airport to return to Mexico. Tiute was taken to a local hospital where attempts to revive him failed.
Tiute's final performance was on Friday December 5th at the All Japan PPV show in Tokyo at Budokan Hall, where he had teamed with former ECW/WWE star Bull Buchanan and former ECW/NWATNA star Justin Credible to defeat Nobutaka Araya, Tomoaki Honma and Kazushi Miyamoto.
Tiute performed in WCW as "The Wall" and Sgt. A-WOL, in XPW as Snuff, and in NWA-TNA as "Malice". He was on the first NWA-TNA show in the "Gauntlet for the Gold" match, where he and Ken Shamrock faced each other at the end for the title. Shamrock came out ahead, and feuded with Malice for a time. As Malice, Tiute worked for World Wrestling All-Stars on several European tours, and had been performing in Japan as Gigantes.
Tiute was 36 years old.
 

Argyle

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Hercules no more....

Ray 'Hercules' Fernandez dead at 46

TSN.ca Staff

3/7/2004
Ray Fernandez, known in the wrestling world as "Hercules" Hernandez, passed away Saturday in his sleep. He was 46.
Hercules, who began wrestling in 1979, wrestled extensively for promotions such as Mid South and Smokey Mountain. He became most famous in the late 1980's, when he worked in the WWF.
His first major match was against Ricky The Dragon Steamboat at WrestleMania 2, and enjoyed a singles career in the company as a mid-card heel performer.
He turned 'face' in 1988 and battled King Haku at WrestleMania V in Atlantic City. Fernandez then formed a team with Paul Roma in the early 1990's known as Power and Glory. He left the company in 1992 with his final appearance on in the WWF Royal Rumble.
Fernandez went over to WCW for a brief stint as Super Invader before wrestling in Japan.
Although 46 is not as early an age as a lot of the wreslters that are passing away so young, it is still a very early age to go...
 

bertrum

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Re: Wrestling

RIP Hercules Hernandez. Scary how many wrestlers are passing on recently. Vince McMahan's influence of steroids is starting to show the effects.
 

Hands of Stone

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Re: Wrestling

Top 10 Matches of WrestleMania. Now I am no longer a Wrestling fan, not with all the great action in the NHL, but all the Old School matches are great to see again.
Can Hogan Slam the Giant?

SpikeTV

hos
 

bertrum

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Re: Wrestling

HOS if you are looking for quality old school wrestling, I have a copy of Starcade 87' with the famous "skywalker match". Don't ask me why. ;)
 

djones

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Re: Wrestling

Starcade '87! Was that the tag team tournament for the Crocket Cup that the Road Warriors won? Or was that teh Great American Bash '85? Or was that Starcade '85? I should see if my brother still has those Pro Wrestling Magazines anymore.

Good times! :)
 

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