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King Cnut

BlazeArmy

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Dec 13, 2002
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I want one of these for the prick who reffed my kids game yesterday. What a cnut!

I have never been homered by an official so consistently in one game like that. From the opening whistle to th 41st minute of the second half when he blew full time ever call was against us. Bastage called game early by my watch as it was obvious our opponents weren't going to hold on to the tie they had going. Last 10 minutes of the game the ball didn't cross half.
 

lita

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If we want our children to have healthy and positive attitudes about sports and athletic activities, it is extremely important for us, as parents, to show them how. As parents, we should treat other fans and spectators, officials, coaches, and the participants with courtesy and respect. We should always set a good example of winning with humility and losing with grace. We should always practice control of our emotions.

Everything we say from the sidelines should be positive. There should never be any displays of anger or temper from the sidelines. We should keep our criticisms to ourselves (criticism of players, officials or coaches), we should avoid teasing of any kind, and there should be no room for baiting or trash-talk. While these behaviors might be prevalent in professional sports arenas they have no place in youth sports. Everyone on the sidelines should be wearing a smile; if we’re not, we should probably be somewhere else. Also, it is probably best to avoid coaching from the sidelines. Typically, our advice is distracting, not terribly helpful, and can’t be heard anyway. A parent’s job is to be the child’s fan, a positive supporter.

We should emphasize fun. Isn’t that why we play games?

We should never encourage our athletes to blame others. We want them to accept responsibility for their own successes and failures. It is important that we not blame the officials, bad luck, other teammates, faulty equipment, or the weather for our children’s lack of success in any particular contest. Mistakes, miscalls and bad luck are all a part of the game.


Finally, remember that it’s only a game and there is a lot more to life than sports.
 

knvb

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Oh for the love of fcuking anything fun and entertaining Lita, please piss off. Your sense of morality is seriously starting to wind me up.
 

Regs

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Jun 28, 2001
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Lita,

Whatever piss-taking you get from here on out is fully deserved. You let your kids on this site and then you post the above in a thread titled King Cnut?!?!?!

:rolleyes:

~Regs.
 

Skip

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lita said:
If we want our children to have healthy and positive attitudes about sports and athletic activities, it is extremely important for us, as parents, to show them how. As parents, we should treat other fans and spectators, officials, coaches, and the participants with courtesy and respect. We should always set a good example of winning with humility and losing with grace. We should always practice control of our emotions.

Everything we say from the sidelines should be positive. There should never be any displays of anger or temper from the sidelines. We should keep our criticisms to ourselves (criticism of players, officials or coaches), we should avoid teasing of any kind, and there should be no room for baiting or trash-talk. While these behaviors might be prevalent in professional sports arenas they have no place in youth sports. Everyone on the sidelines should be wearing a smile; if we’re not, we should probably be somewhere else. Also, it is probably best to avoid coaching from the sidelines. Typically, our advice is distracting, not terribly helpful, and can’t be heard anyway. A parent’s job is to be the child’s fan, a positive supporter.

We should emphasize fun. Isn’t that why we play games?

We should never encourage our athletes to blame others. We want them to accept responsibility for their own successes and failures. It is important that we not blame the officials, bad luck, other teammates, faulty equipment, or the weather for our children’s lack of success in any particular contest. Mistakes, miscalls and bad luck are all a part of the game.


Finally, remember that it’s only a game and there is a lot more to life than sports.

Has anyone seen the soap box around???
 

crafty cokcney

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Lita,
One should not generalize all sports with this one minded philosophy. What you describe is probably true in part when it comes to soccer here and that is why the national game is sub-standard and quite frankly shite and useless. However, I doubt very much whether this so called philosophy applies at all to lets say Hockey. I understand that the youth level is highly competetive and that winning is everything. Maybe, and I could be wrong, that is why Canada are WORLD CHAMPIONS!

Just a thought.? :rolleyes:
 

One Dart

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I for one applaud Lita's sense of fair play. Isn't that what it's all about anyways? I mean, come on guys, aren't we all out for a little bit of fun? Personally, when I am engaged in any type of sporting activity I rarely, if ever, keep score. On the same token, I would never offer any assistance to the head official because they are always well trained individuals who keep the best interests of the game in mind; why would they need my help? When coaching, I encourage my players to play hard, but not too hard, it would be silly if any of them were to be injured and be forced to miss out on any part of their education. Cheers Lita, I always appreciate reading the educated, informed posts that you have to offer the rest of us!
 

TheRob

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lita said:
If we want our children to have healthy and positive attitudes about sports and athletic activities, it is extremely important for us, as parents, to show them how. As parents, we should treat other fans and spectators, officials, coaches, and the participants with courtesy and respect. We should always set a good example of winning with humility and losing with grace. We should always practice control of our emotions.

Everything we say from the sidelines should be positive. There should never be any displays of anger or temper from the sidelines. We should keep our criticisms to ourselves (criticism of players, officials or coaches), we should avoid teasing of any kind, and there should be no room for baiting or trash-talk. While these behaviors might be prevalent in professional sports arenas they have no place in youth sports. Everyone on the sidelines should be wearing a smile; if we’re not, we should probably be somewhere else. Also, it is probably best to avoid coaching from the sidelines. Typically, our advice is distracting, not terribly helpful, and can’t be heard anyway. A parent’s job is to be the child’s fan, a positive supporter.

We should emphasize fun. Isn’t that why we play games?

We should never encourage our athletes to blame others. We want them to accept responsibility for their own successes and failures. It is important that we not blame the officials, bad luck, other teammates, faulty equipment, or the weather for our children’s lack of success in any particular contest. Mistakes, miscalls and bad luck are all a part of the game.


Finally, remember that it’s only a game and there is a lot more to life than sports.
If I didn't know any better Lita, I'd think you were trying to bring Fastshow out of retirement.
 

Dial 9-1-1

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Lita, I wouldn't word it quite like you did, but for the most part, I agree. When it comes to sports, especially when we are dealing with kids, people need to relax. Period.

Play hard. Play fair. Do your best. But...shut your mouth and tell your yahoo parents on the sideline who are living their lives vicariously through you to do likewise. They're embarrassing. So is that yahoo coach who thinks he's the Bobby Knight of the U-6 silver league. (Blaze...this ain't directed at you).

I just find it extremely ironic/hypocritical that "adults" who often chastize their kids for "misbehaving" and "acting immaturely" or "not playing nicely" get so hostile and immature at a little league game.
 

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